EHT

Event Horizon Telescope

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is an experiment that is being performed on a global array of radio telescopes that span the Earth from Hawaii to Chile and from the South Pole to Greenland. The goal of the observations carried out with the telescope array is to study black holes at very high spatial resolution and to image the event horizons of supermassive black holes. The unprecedented 10-microarcsecond resolution allows new studies of black hole environments that can shed light on the properties of these mysterious objects.

Our research group is a key node of the international Event Horizon Telescope collaboration and contributes to the experiment by performing numerical simulations of black hole environments, devising and carrying out tests of the theory of General Relativity, and developing statistical analysis and model comparison tools to extract physical information from the data. Starting in 2000, Dr. Ozel, her collaborators, and her students have led the study of images from supermassive black holes and identified the optimal observing window where the horizon of a black hole becomes visible to observers.

The dependence of the size of a black hole image on observing frequency, which shows that at 230 GHz (1.3 mm) the size is comparable to the predicted size of the black hole shadow; Ozel, Psaltis, Narayan, 2000

https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1086/309396/pdf

The dependence of the size of a black hole image on observing frequency, which shows that at 230 GHz (1.3 mm) the size is comparable to the predicted size of the black hole shadow; Ozel, Psaltis, Narayan, 2000

Ozel’s research group has developed extensive computer simulations of the accretion flow, using magnetohydrodynamic and new ray-tracing algorithms. This includes the first time-dependent simulation of the accretion flow around the supermassive black hole Sgr A* in the Milky Way and the first application of GPU technology to perform high-throughput simulations of black hole images and spectra.

Click below to read more about Dr. Ozel’s and University of Arizona’s key contributions to the EHT project.